TiVo Community Forum

TiVo Community Forum Archive 2
Covering threads with a last post date between
July 1, 2004 and December 31, 2005.
THIS IS A READ ONLY SITE
 


 

SEARCH  |  ARCHIVE 1 MAIN SITE

 
Forum Jump
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 04-16-2005, 11:57 PM   #91 (Print)
HDTiVo
Not so Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 2,566
Let me ask a serious question.

Using windows emulation on a recent MAC, say less than 2 years old, how would the playback performance be of a .tivo with WMP?

__________________
TiVo: There is A Better Plan
HDTiVo is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-17-2005, 12:01 AM   #92 (Print)
Fofer
Blah blah blah
 
Fofer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 17,104
Send a message via AIM to Fofer
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTiVo
Using windows emulation on a recent MAC, say less than 2 years old, how would the playback performance be of a .tivo with WMP?


Considering that even standard WMP files are pretty much unwatchable under windows emulation (choppy, sound out of sync, etc.) then I'd bet that .tivo files would play just as poorly.

You're better off just hacking the TiVo to enable the age-old (verboten) extraction techniques, and use that windows emulator instead to run the extraction utilities. Voila! MPEG-2 files that play very nicely in QuickTime Player on the Mac. No pesky DRM, either.
Fofer is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-17-2005, 07:20 AM   #93 (Print)
livestrong
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 16
This really irritates me. I know I would not have any sound issues if I was using my PB.
livestrong is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-17-2005, 11:21 AM   #94 (Print)
Jeffsters
Registered User
 
Jeffsters's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 20
Hey Pony! I'm a PM at a major hi-Tech company too and you are a brave man to chime in here. But lets be honest there are two stories here. The public company position which in this case is just the right amount of ambiguous and customer placating in that you promise nothing, set no time for any delivery, and fain understanding and empathy so not to negatively impact sales in the short term. Good! ;-) The other, as expressed by your CFO (who holds the resource dollars) is the result of the real story behind the public positioning. There are obviously issues, some technical, some platform, some resource, some financial, and some market, that have made it such that you haven't even begun to work on a Mac version. I can tell. ;-) "Working towards support" is VERY different than something like "We have resources devoted to...". The former means that you are always working towards updating your market requirements and should the technical environment change, you'll devote resources to a Mac version while the later means you are actively working on it with a delivery schedule. I mean it's hard to announce a time table without a project.

From my limited knowledge, I'm just a three unit TiVo customer, you guys excluded and alienated a large percentage of your customers with a significant new feature. Do you think it was a OC user that turned me on to TiVo? Uh huh. Look, you have the numbers and percentages, I don't, though I fear based upon this debacle you don't really have a handle on the platform mix of your subscribers. So you made a business decision and I really hope it was a conscious one. But to me, these customers, this segment of your overall customer base, is known in marketing circles to have a lot of disposable $$$$ to spend and are very willing to spend it for cool technology. These customers are media savvy, and have all the applications and hardware tools, to fully exploit what you're selling. They "get it". Add to that these customers are running a standard suite of tools on standard hardware and you have a great testing and launch vehicle for something like TiVo2Go. As a senior product manager at a major cross-platform software/hardware vendor I have no problem saying that, in my view, was a VERY poor decision.

Besides, what are you going to do if Microsoft continues to commoditize the whole Media experience on Windows and starts to include DVR as standard? What will be your differentiator then? What it "should be" is a a better experience based upon open standards on as many platforms as possible. Make no mistake as long as you are tied to MS you will be able to provide only what they allow and when it suits them, once you've built the market and proven the model, they will destroy you make no mistake.

Anyway....let me leave you with a little unsolicited PM to PM advice...beware the ancient Chinese proverb. "Those who foolishly choose to ride the back of the Tiger often end up inside".

Good luck!
Jeffsters

P.S. I love my TiVo (I have three series II boxes in my home) I just hate you've placed me in a position to consider alternatives like EyeTV, and you should hate that too.
Jeffsters is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-17-2005, 11:29 AM   #95 (Print)
Jeffsters
Registered User
 
Jeffsters's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 20
Grrr..I can't post URLS!

Ok...go to Apple's developer site and search for "Quicktime plug-in encryption"..

"QuickTime is supplied with about 180 built-in components. It also contains an API that lets you create new components. For example, you could create a component to support a special data encryption algorithm. Multiple applications could then perform encryption by connecting to your component instead of having to implement the algorithm themselves."

Questions?
Jeffsters is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-17-2005, 06:27 PM   #96 (Print)
HTH
No Avatar Selected
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 3,735
So... can SonicDVD master a DVD image file instead of burning a DVD? I'd rather not have to repeatedly erase an RW disk in order to transfer TiVo video from the PC to the Mac in non-DMCA violating fashion. (I'm saving my free trial until I've gotten all my TiVo's videos transferred in order to make the most of the 15 days.)

__________________
┌──┬──┐
─├┤┬├┤─ There is no spool.
└─────┘

If you are dissatisfied with your life, return unused portion for partial refund.
HTH is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-17-2005, 08:38 PM   #97 (Print)
Jeffsters
Registered User
 
Jeffsters's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 20
Sorry mergy, this isn't correct. This is exactly the job of the product manager who "manages" if not "owns" the product roadmap. No one knows more than the PM about a product it's their job.
Jeffsters is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 09:52 AM   #98 (Print)
Johnny Mnemonic
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turtleboy
Killing the dongle killed Mac support.

That's it, isn't it?

When there was going to be a dongle based encryption solution, it was both mac/pc compatible. However, when Tivo (correctly) decided not to do a dongle solution but a software solution, it no longer worked for the mac.


I think you have it exactly right. A dongle would have enabled Mac/PC dual support with a little trouble, but the feedback Tivo received on the dongle use convinced them to move away from it (and I agree, a dongle would have sucked.)

So a software solution was determined and presented, and Mac compatibility was either forgotten about as a requirement, or vaguely promised by the software vendors, but it wasn't properly verified and has now proven to be difficult to implement.

Now no one knows how, exactly, to live up to the promises; and cross-platform DRM is indeed a pretty thorny nut. I'm not sure I know of any cross-platform DRM solutions besides iTunes music files.

How about offering Mac users the option of the dongle? It would suck, and there'd be plenty of screaming: "why do PC users get a software solution, but Mac users are relegated to having to use some crappy, easy to lose, USB-port taking, breakable dongle?" But it'd be better than nothing.

If TTG for the Mac really will eventually come out, and is really being worked on, I would prefer a software solution, and I'll wait for it. But if that's not really true, I would prefer to have a USB dongle--tolerable, actually, for desktops--than nothing at all (the bummer is that TTG would be nicest on portables, and the dongle would be worse there.)

In all honesty, I could really care less. When I'm at a computer, I do computer stuff; when I'm at my TV, I watch TV. I'm not sure why I'd want to spend an hour downloading the video to my computer, only to watch it in an office chair vs. the couch, and on a smaller screen to boot. The only time I have a computer present when I don't also have the option of watching a TV is when I'm at work; and so rightly I'm not watching shows then either. Being able to archive to DVD has a little interest, as most stuff isn't worth watching a second time anyways, let alone spending the time ripping to DVD. And even at that, I'd want to be able to edit out the commericals, and I'm not clear if that's possible on the PC version of TTG.

So all that is to say: TTG for the Mac would be nice. But I can wait, even until the end of this year. I'm not lusting for it. But if it actually is never gonna happen in it's current form, it would still be nice to be able to do it, and for that I would accept the option of using a dongle.

There is the matter of being lied to, which is problematic and makes me wonder if TiVo corpporate has the werewithal to stay a going concern; if the right hand doesn't know what the left hand is doing, you have gross inefficiencies and it doesn't seem like Tivo can afford that (unlike, say, Sony.) But that's just a symptom.
Johnny Mnemonic is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 10:05 AM   #99 (Print)
cwoody222
TiVo + Mac = :(
 
cwoody222's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 5,944
Send a message via AIM to cwoody222
I think the main concern about the dongle was price. And some usability ("oops, I left my dongle at home").

But would anyone here say that the slow, buggy, overly-password-protected and proprietary OS solution they came up with a full year later is any better?

TTG is, overall, a great disappointment to many. At the very least they should have stuck w/ the dongle if only so as to disappoint ALL their users


I don't understand why they can't use the dongle for Mac users only. At least that'll give us SOMETHING. If we wait for a MacOS software based solution we're going to be waiting a looooooong time.
cwoody222 is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 10:12 AM   #100 (Print)
Unix_Beard
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 432
I'll take a dongle.

And to reiterate, the only reason *I* want TTG is to archive shows on DVD. Like this weekend, the Pixies were on Austin City Limits for the full hour. I want to save that and rewatch it. But I can't....
Unix_Beard is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 10:24 AM   #101 (Print)
Unix_Beard
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 432
Quote:
Originally Posted by davezatz
I can only speculate, but I imagine all the code has since been rewritten and last year's Mac dongle solution no longer works. I imagine Tivo gave up hardware validation as impractical and expensive.

If they can encrypt and play back on the Tivo box (Linux) then I assume they could write a software decoder/player for the Mac platform (Unix underpinnings). Since nothing has been released yet and it appears technically possible, I assume Tivo is not throwing enough resources at the problem. As far as editing and burning on the Mac side of the house, they haven't even alluded to that this year - and I just don't see it happening given Tivo's commitment to restricting file access.

Oh well.


I'm no programmer but couldn't they just add a Quicktime plug in that does the same thing the Tivo decryption thing does now on Windows? I don't get it.
Unix_Beard is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 10:34 AM   #102 (Print)
NotVeryWitty
Don't Panic!
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: New England
Posts: 111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turtleboy
Killing the dongle killed Mac support.

That's it, isn't it?

When there was going to be a dongle based encryption solution, it was both mac/pc compatible. However, when Tivo (correctly) decided not to do a dongle solution but a software solution, it no longer worked for the mac.


I just can't imagine why they would be able to decrypt the TTG stream through a dongle, but would be unable to write a software decrypter. (The algorithm part of the code is already written and working under Windows, they could easily re-compile it to run under OSX.) The speculation has been that there's no good way to add a plug-in to the QuickTime player. If that *is* the problem, it would be a problem for the dongle too.

IMO, the killing of the dongle (which I agree was a good decision) has nothing to do with why we don't have Mac support of TTG.
NotVeryWitty is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 11:39 AM   #103 (Print)
skillsrhodes
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 58
I don't think that killing the dongle killed the Mac support. I think the choice to go with Windows Media DRM is what killed it. It seems like the fair conclusion at this point is that it's TiVo doing the encrypting and adding the WM DRM, and while it would be fairly straightforward (I suspect) to have TiVo Desktop tell the box to use either WM DRM or a Quicktime DRM, it would be EXPENSIVE. Here is the price structure for Windows DRM ....

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/wi...ensingfees.aspx

So Tivo either has to create their own Quicktime DRM solution (costly in manpower) or purchase one like this (REALLY costly in real money). And as for creating a Quicktime plugin solution, I would be shocked if Microsoft's licensing agreement didn't SPECIFICALLY preclude someone from trying something like that. Or it could be that the looming threat of a DMCA suit for illegal reverse-engineering is enough to keep them from trying it.

I still think it's a crappy decision and, as lots have pointed out, ignores what I suspect is their best customer demographic.

skills
skillsrhodes is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:13 PM   #104 (Print)
davezatz
[...]
 
davezatz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 2,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by skillsrhodes
I don't think that killing the dongle killed the Mac support. I think the choice to go with Windows Media DRM is what killed it.

I don't think they are using Windows DRM at all... I think they are using DirectShow specifications to handle their own DRM and video content. The thing I keep going back to is that the Tivo box can decrypt for playback on Tivo which is not Windows... Someone smarter than me want to set us straight?
davezatz is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:16 PM   #105 (Print)
gonzotek
tivo_xml developer
 
gonzotek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Outside Phildadelphia
Posts: 1,042
TTG DOES NOT USE Windows Media DRM. It uses a proprietary method, developed in-house by Arthur van Hoff. The evidence to support this claim is:
a) Examinations of the file format by third parties have shown it to be a unique and previously unknown format, completely unlike any of the Windows DRM implementations seen so far.
b) The resume of Mr. van Hoff, which states he "Designed TiVo’s DRM for in-home Media, DRM for Internet distributed content, content publishing, content encoding and encryption, and third party application strategy."
gonzotek is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:18 PM   #106 (Print)
cwoody222
TiVo + Mac = :(
 
cwoody222's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Buffalo, NY
Posts: 5,944
Send a message via AIM to cwoody222
Can someone explain what the difference is between the DRM and "DirectShow"?

(seriously - I don't understand what each one does, which is Windows-exclusive and which isn't, which one TiVo designed themselves, etc)

Layman's terms please.


Edit: my brief understanding is that TiVo created the DRM themselves and it requires something called the "DirectShow filter" which IS a MS product. That MS product is required to 'unlock' the DRM.

TiVo's DRM relies on this filter for playback on DirectShow-enabled devices.

There is no DirectShow-enabled devices for Mac - and the only one for Windows is WMP.

Is that close?
cwoody222 is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:23 PM   #107 (Print)
ZeoTiVo
fantastic four TiVos
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 7,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by davezatz
I don't think they are using Windows DRM at all... I think they are using DirectShow specifications to handle their own DRM and video content. Someone smarter than me want to set us straight?

don't know about the smarter
but it was Arthur Van Hoff who designed the DRM for TiVoToGo and it is just a directShow filter DLL that fires it up on the PC. No licensing agreement needed on Windows and thus no agreement to not do soemthing on the Mac.
I can only imagine a technical reason would keep TiVo from getting out TTG for Mac. You can download the .tivo files to the mac no problem and it is known that you can play and edit the mpegs that are at the heart of the .tivo files on the Mac so that only leaves DRM as the hurdle to cross. Obviously TiVo has little to say about how or when to cross this hurdle , leaving us all to speculate on why they say so little or what the hurdle can be specifically
ZeoTiVo is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:26 PM   #108 (Print)
davezatz
[...]
 
davezatz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 2,068
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzotek
b) The resume of Mr. van Hoff, which states he "Designed TiVo’s DRM for in-home Media, DRM for Internet distributed content, content publishing, content encoding and encryption, and third party application strategy."

So I was perusing his site, and it's awfully entertaining that the guy who designed Tivo's DRM is providing a link on how to bypass it using GraphEdit. Now that is some funny stuff. Does he have to refund his salary to Tivo?
davezatz is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:31 PM   #109 (Print)
ZeoTiVo
fantastic four TiVos
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 7,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by davezatz
So I was perusing his site, and it's awfully entertaining that the guy who designed Tivo's DRM is providing a link on how to bypass it using GraphEdit. Now that is some funny stuff. Does he have to refund his salary to Tivo?


for the last week after I read his site I have been giving out a link to his site to people who want to do things like play TiVo files on their Portable players
ZeoTiVo is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:31 PM   #110 (Print)
gonzotek
tivo_xml developer
 
gonzotek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Outside Phildadelphia
Posts: 1,042
Quote:
Can someone explain what the difference is between the DRM and "DirectShow"?

(seriously - I don't understand what each one does, which is Windows-exclusive and which isn't, which one TiVo designed themselves, etc)

Layman's terms please.


Edit: my brief understanding is that TiVo created the DRM themselves and it requires something called the "DirectShow filter" which IS a MS product. That MS product is required to 'unlock' the DRM.

TiVo's DRM relies on this filter for playback on DirectShow-enabled devices.

There is no DirectShow-enabled devices for Mac - and the only one for Windows is WMP.

Is that close?
DRM is Digital Rights Management. It is the general term used for any content (regardless of implementation) that has been in some way locked down by the rights owner. This may involve encryption, playback and/or access controls, network-based authentication, or other methods. The content scrambling system used on DVDs is a form of DRM. They are designed only to playback on industry-approved players. iTunes m4p files is another form of DRM. They can only be played back on devices that have been given a license unique to the user who purchased the files.

DirectShow is a part of a whole slew of media services for Windows. DirectShow filters can load files, parse them into seperate parts, decode or otherwise manipulate the data in them, hand off that data to other directshow filters, and eventually display, play or otherwise output that data(writing it to a file, or streaming it over a network, etc). Any given example of something that can be done with a directshow filter could be achieved in various other technologies. There's nothing magic about them.

More info available at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_Rights_Management
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DirectShow

Last edited by gonzotek : 04-18-2005 at 03:47 PM.
gonzotek is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:39 PM   #111 (Print)
Unix_Beard
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 432
Wait up. If Tivo encrypts their files so that ONLY a Microsoft DLL can decrypt it, wouldn't that loosely be called a Microsoft DRM?
Unix_Beard is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:51 PM   #112 (Print)
gonzotek
tivo_xml developer
 
gonzotek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Outside Phildadelphia
Posts: 1,042
Not in the sense we're discussing. Microsoft produces and licenses its own DRM solutions to third parties. TiVo COULD have used one of these solutions, but instead developed its own. The current Windows implementation utilizes the DirectShow system, because, on Windows at least, it is very compatible with most if not all the existing hardware and software out there (<- that is my speculation). The files are not encrypted such that ONLY a Microsoft DLL can decrypt it, but (and here's the problem for Mac, et al. users)only a Microsoft DLL has been produced thus far that can decrypt them.

If they had used a MS-licensed solution, then they would be at Microsoft's mercy as to supporting future platforms. That would likely be even worse news for Mac users than the current state of affairs.
gonzotek is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:56 PM   #113 (Print)
Dennis Wilkinson
Registered User
 
Dennis Wilkinson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: East Freetown, MA
Posts: 1,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unix_Beard
Wait up. If Tivo encrypts their files so that ONLY a Microsoft DLL can decrypt it, wouldn't that loosely be called a Microsoft DRM?


It it were really a Microsoft DLL, yes. In this case, though, it's a TiVo DLL (it's only a "Microsoft DLL" in the sense that it runs on Windows -- it was coded by TiVo programmers.)

It should be perfectly possible to code this in QuickTime. The unknowns are:

- whether they could do this in such a way as to feed the decrypted MPEG2 to Apple's MPEG2 decompressor or if they'd have to write their own/license someone's (it doesn't seem unreasonable to get it to Apple's version, but the MPEG support in QuickTime is a little odd and not well documented for developers.)

- whether TiVo would be able to continue to enforce any restrictions on the media once it's been decrypted to prevent someone from just exporting it from QuickTime Player Pro to any old format. I haven't looked at these parts of QuickTime's API myself, but again, this seems at least possible since this is done with FairPlay'd AAC.

__________________
Dennis
Dennis Wilkinson is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:56 PM   #114 (Print)
Unix_Beard
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 432
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzotek
Not in the sense we're discussing. Microsoft produces and licenses its own DRM solutions to third parties. TiVo COULD have used one of these solutions, but instead developed its own. The current Windows implementation utilizes the DirectShow system, because, on Windows at least, it is very compatible with most if not all the existing hardware and software out there (<- that is my speculation). The files are not encrypted such that ONLY a Microsoft DLL can decrypt it, but (and here's the problem for Mac, et al. users)only a Microsoft DLL has been produced thus far that can decrypt them.

If they had used a MS-licensed solution, then they would be at Microsoft's mercy as to supporting future platforms. That would likely be even worse news for Mac users than the current state of affairs.


So its DRM reliant on Microsoft technology. You are splitting hairs.

Or are you suggesting the DirectShow DLL is freely available and open source?
Unix_Beard is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 12:58 PM   #115 (Print)
Fofer
Blah blah blah
 
Fofer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 17,104
Send a message via AIM to Fofer
Quote:
Originally Posted by davezatz
So I was perusing his site, and it's awfully entertaining that the guy who designed Tivo's DRM is providing a link on how to bypass it using GraphEdit. Now that is some funny stuff. Does he have to refund his salary to Tivo?


I just googled to see what you're talking about. That's pretty weird. I wonder what the backstory is on that?
Fofer is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 01:01 PM   #116 (Print)
Dennis Wilkinson
Registered User
 
Dennis Wilkinson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: East Freetown, MA
Posts: 1,431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unix_Beard
So its DRM reliant on Microsoft technology. You are splitting hairs.


You're over-generalizing, at least as far as the DRM is concerned. You package executable code on Windows as DLLs, and in this case you export functions to make you look like a DirectShow filter. The majority of the code is still going to be the DRM logic, which is TiVo's. On the Mac, you'd package as a dynamic library of some flavor, and export functions that make you look like a QuickTime component. The point is that they don't need anything from Microsoft to put similar code on the Mac.

You can't just recompile, but you're really only rewriting platform-specific glue, assuming that the algorithm is well-compartmentalized.

__________________
Dennis
Dennis Wilkinson is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 01:04 PM   #117 (Print)
ZeoTiVo
fantastic four TiVos
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 7,704
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unix_Beard
So its DRM reliant on Microsoft technology. You are splitting hairs.

Or are you suggesting the DirectShow DLL is freely available and open source?


that is like saying a database coded in Access is reliant on Microsoft technology.
A true statement and one would not know the extent of a rewrite to move the database to Oracle or whatever until all the SQl and procedures were looked at,
but it most likely could be done.

speculation is Tivo felt the quicktime filters to open to use.

Until TiVo decides to tell us some actual stuff then we can only speculate, which sucks
ZeoTiVo is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 01:11 PM   #118 (Print)
Fofer
Blah blah blah
 
Fofer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 17,104
Send a message via AIM to Fofer
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeoTiVo
Until TiVo decides to tell us some actual stuff then we can only speculate, which sucks


And in the meantime we can hack.


Good going, TiVo!
Fofer is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 01:18 PM   #119 (Print)
Unix_Beard
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 432
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeoTiVo
that is like saying a database coded in Access is reliant on Microsoft technology.


I don't think so. Microsoft gives you the ability to export the data in Access and use Filemaker Pro.

Does Microsoft publish and make freely available the contents and code within the DirectShow filter?
Unix_Beard is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
Old 04-18-2005, 01:20 PM   #120 (Print)
Unix_Beard
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 432
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZeoTiVo
speculation is Tivo felt the quicktime filters to open to use.


The quicktime filters were too open? Geez, we are talking about Everybody Loves Raymond not someone's freakin' medical records!
Unix_Beard is offline Report Bad Post Report Post
 
Forum Jump
Thread Tools

Go Back  TiVo Community Archive2 > Main TiVo Forums > TiVo Coffee House - TiVo Discussion

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:33 PM.


Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(C)opyright - All Rights Reserved. No information may be posted elsewhere without written permission.
TiVo® is a registered trademark of TiVo Inc. This site is not affiliated with TiVo Inc.


Spider History Index